Date: 21st June 2019

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Rosé – from Provence with Love or White Zin for your Sins!

Rosé wine brings out so many relaxing memories within people…… that classy friend’s BBQ last summer serving pale pink Provence Rosé, the glass of Rioja Rosado back in Spain which cost less than a Coca-Cola or those Friday nights in front of the TV with a bottle of White Zin!

Rosé splits opinions when it probably shouldn’t. Sure, I’m yet to sit down and enjoy a bottle of Rosé with my brothers (Brosé?) but why should we think of it as being anything other than a lighter, more refreshing version of red wine? That’s right, for those who don’t spend their weekends reading wine books, Rosé is made from red wine grapes. The clues are in the names, with White Zinfandel being the perfect example. Zinfandel being a poplar red wine in California, White Zinfindel is simply a version with less colour, less dryness and greater popularity!

 Pale or Bright Pink

Pale Rosé is a style, not an indication of quality. Yes, the very best dry rosé wines do come from Provence and yes they are pale pink but some grapes simply have more colour than others plus the time grape skins are in contact with the wine greatly affects the colour of the wine.

 

 

Irish News, 20/05/19

 

Dry or Less Dry

Notice I avoid saying sweet because even White Zinfandel isn’t as sweet as Coca Cola. The sweetness levels in rosé results from residual sugars. A rosé from Provence or New Zealand may have very little residual sugars while a White Zinfandel may have lots. So, on the sweetness level of rosé wine, it’s “horses for courses”!  If you haven’t tried the Portuguese Rosé idol that is Mateus, I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised by its refreshing yet less dry fruitiness.  On a hot summer’s day in Lisbon, the thirsty locals can be seen enjoying a bottle of Mateus in their street cafes.

Spicy or Simply Served

Rosé can match beautifully with Food. White Zinfandel can challenge beers crown for matching well with a spicy Indian curry, it’s a “once you’ve tried it, you’ll believe it” flavour combination. However, if a pale pink Provence rosé is more your thing and you have the BBQ lit, try a glass with your grilled prawns or fish. Its crisp delicate citrusy flavours pairs beautifully with BBQ prawns.

Fingers crossed for a long hot summer so that you can rethink your pink, and maybe even enjoy a rosé with your bros!

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